Tadcaster Everest climb man beaten by weather

The Walking With The Wounded team in front of Mount Everest (centre back). (left to right) Captain Francis Atkinson, Henry Chaplin (above), Karl Hinett (below), Captain David Wiseman, Private Jaco van Gass, Martin Hewitt, Dan Majid.  The Walking With The Wounded team have performed so well in training that they will be treated no differently from able-bodied climbers when they take on Mount Everest, the expedition leader said today.  PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday April 12, 2012. Five injured soldiers with gunshot wounds, horrific burns and amputated limbs will attempt to reach the summit of the world's highest mountain in May. See PA story CHARITY Everest. Photo credit should read: James Edgar/PA Wire

The Walking With The Wounded team in front of Mount Everest (centre back). (left to right) Captain Francis Atkinson, Henry Chaplin (above), Karl Hinett (below), Captain David Wiseman, Private Jaco van Gass, Martin Hewitt, Dan Majid. The Walking With The Wounded team have performed so well in training that they will be treated no differently from able-bodied climbers when they take on Mount Everest, the expedition leader said today. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday April 12, 2012. Five injured soldiers with gunshot wounds, horrific burns and amputated limbs will attempt to reach the summit of the world's highest mountain in May. See PA story CHARITY Everest. Photo credit should read: James Edgar/PA Wire

0
Have your say

A TADCASTER army captain who was shot by the Taliban has had to abandon his dream of climbing Mount Everest this week.

Captain David Wiseman, along with four other injured servicemen, was forced to call off their feat after unusually warm weather had increased the risk of avalanches - turning it into a death trap.

Expedition manager Martin Hewitt said he was “gutted” but to carry on would mean “certain serious injury and potential loss of life”.

The group arrived in Nepal in March and had hoped to reach the summit of Everest towards the end of the month.

The soldiers had suffered gun shot wounds, burns and amputated limbs while serving in Afghanistan and Iraq.

They had hoped to become the first group of injured servicemen to climb the world’s highest mountain.

Prince Harry, charity patron for Walking with the Wounded, revealed the decision at the Atlantic Council in Washington on Monday, where he was given a humanitarian award.

He said: “I have to be the first to say they have been frustrated from reaching the summit by the unusually warm weather, which brings particularly dangerous conditions.

“However, the mere fact that they are up there on that fearsome peak, I find totally amazing.”

Captain Wiseman, 29, survived a shot to the chest in November 2009 while on patrol in Afghanistan, resulting in nerve damage.