Tributes to special constable who wanted to make a difference

wet Pictured before the memorial service to mark the 20th anniversary of the murder of Special Constable Glenn Goodman are his son Thomas and parents Margaret and Brian. (120614M2a)
wet Pictured before the memorial service to mark the 20th anniversary of the murder of Special Constable Glenn Goodman are his son Thomas and parents Margaret and Brian. (120614M2a)
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A MEMORIAL service has been held to mark the 20th anniversary of the murder of a Tadcaster special constable who was shot and killed by an IRA terrorist.

The service at St Mary’s Church in Tadcaster last Thursday, paid tribute to Glenn Goodman, 37, who was shot dead on June 7 1992 by IRA gunman Paul Magee.

Mr Goodman’s parents Brian and Margaret were among those gathered at the ceremony. They were joined by retired and serving police officers, community leaders and friends and family of special constable Goodman.

Speaking at the afternoon service, Chief Constable of North Yorkshire Police, Tim Madgwick, paid tribute to Glenn and the police force. who he said faced difficult and dangerous situations every day.

He said: “Special constable Goodman’s tragic death is an extreme case, but every day, especially on weekend evenings, thousands of special constables are on duty alongside their regular colleagues, dealing with exactly the same sort of incidents and facing the same challenges and dangers.

“When Glenn was murdered he was acting in the finest traditions of British policing, Glenn in his words joined the special constabulary to ‘make a difference’.

He told those present that the murder of Glenn in the early hours of that fateful Sunday morning had “rocked” North Yorkshire Police, Glenn’s family and the wider community.

North Yorkshire Force Chaplain, Rev Simon Rudkin, conducted the service at Tadcaster last Thursday.

He told the gathering: “We are here today because Glenn paid the ultimate price for wanting ‘to make a difference’.

“We can wonder at and, perhaps, be grateful for, such instances of courageous and selfless service.”

Special constable Goodman was on one of his first patrols with North Yorkshire Police when he and his colleague, PC Sandy Kelly, made a routine check on a car on the A64 near Tadcaster.

The car contained two IRA terrorists, who shot and badly wounded both of them.

Constable Goodman later died in hospital while PC Kelly, although badly wounded, survived.

After a police manhunt, Magee was eventually captured and was found guilty of the murder and sentenced to life in prison in 1993.

Magee and his accomplice Michael O’Brian, were later freed in 2000 under the Good Friday Agreement, despite protests from Glenn’s parents not to release him.